Why Reach Out at All?

bf12cf208fe99c47d926428de6a91562So the question has come up several times in the last few weeks as to why I am so committed to reaching out as I do. Why reach out to the LGBTQ community at all, especially living in the South where being Baptist and talking to them at all virtually guarantees I’ll never have a pastorate of my own? I mean, am I gay myself? Do I plan on “becoming gay”? On the other hand, am I simply trying to get LGBTQ people to change, to “repent” of being gay (or lesbian or whatever) so they can go to heaven when they die? I wanted to take the time to clarify, both for myself and for others reading this, as to just why this ministry is so important. That first question is really the one I want to answer, but let me start with the others first.

Am I gay? No. I am happily married to a beautiful woman and quite content with that. Do I plan on “becoming gay”? No. Again, if you missed it the first time, I am happily married to a beautiful woman and quite content with that. So why reach like this? Am I trying to get LGBTQ people to “repent” so they can go to heaven when they die? Yet again, no. I am not. We get the idea that they even need to from passages like 1 Corinthians 6:9-10, which reads, “Or do you not know that the unrighteous will not inherit the kingdom of God? Do not be deceived: neither the sexually immoral, nor idolaters, nor adulterers, nor men who practice homosexuality, nor thieves, nor the greedy, nor drunkards, nor revilers, nor swindlers will inherit the kingdom of God.” Seems pretty straightforward, right? If you’re gay, you don’t go to heaven unless you stop being gay. The problem with that interpretation comes when you look at the other categories listed in this passage. In Matthew 5:27-28, Jesus equates adultery with lust, meaning  if you’re guilty of the second you’re also guilty of the first. I’ve known a lot of Christian guys over the years who’ve struggled with that one, and if you apply the same logic to lust that we just applied to being gay, well, they’re not going to heaven, either. And that’s a problem, because in Hebrews 10:12 we’re also told that Jesus’ death on the cross was enough to pay the price for all sin. Period. End of sentence. You can’t add to that sacrifice, meaning nothing else is needed for eternal life. So in a roundabout way, no, I am not reaching out to the LGBTQ community because I believe that your sexuality is something that has to dramatically change in order for you to be acceptable in God’s sight. 

So why, then? If what the Bible says is true (and I understand that there are a lot of people reading this who disagree with that and that’s fine; just hear me out), then we as Christians have the hope within us that changes everything. The hope of life after death, the hope of a relationship with the one who made you and gave his life so that that relationship could be restored. You see Christianity isn’t just about being loving or accepting others as they are or even fighting for your civil rights (although it is all of those things). It’s about that relationship, and sharing that with you so that you can come home to the one who loves you as you are, whether you’re straight, trans, gay, lesbian, or whatever. He calls to us through our desires and our hopes and our dreams. He wants us back.  And if we as Christians treat you the way that we have historically, then you don’t see that. You don’t want anything to do with that. And for me, that’s a problem. You can read what I’ve written, you can examine the claims of Christianity, and you can think the whole thing is a crock and go on with your life and that’s fine. We all have free will. We all get to make that choice. However, if you can’t even look at what the Bible says because of our actions as Christians, well, that’s not so fine. That’s our fault. The only thing that keeps you out of heaven is what you decide to do with Jesus and what he offers (Matthew 7:23). So why do I do what I do? I want you as members of the LGBTQ community to have a fair shot at making that choice. You deserve it.

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2 thoughts on “Why Reach Out at All?

  1. I like your perspective. It’s one that try to reflect in my own posts for all sorts of things that might make someone feel like a “Church Outsider.” Thanks so much for saying in words what I am only sort of able to say through my graphic works. Looking forward to exploring more of your posts!

    Like

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