The Last Few Weeks

hqdefaultSeveral weeks ago, I published here an open letter to the Southern Baptist Convention on the subject or our treatment of the LGBTQ community. In that time, I have forwarded this letter to every Baptist organization I can think of that is in the public eye and therefore in a position to do the most good (including, among others, the North American Missions Board, the Ethics and Religious Liberty Commission, and the Baptist Press). Given how touchy we Christians can be on the subject of homosexuality, I expected to get a flurry of responses. What I got instead was silence. Our stance that the concerns of the LGBTQ community do not represent a civil rights issue is causing nothing but hurt and we don’t even want to talk about it.

When I finally did get a response from the Ethics and Religious Liberty Commission (ERLC), I was able to understand better the logic and the reasoning behind our position as a Convention on the civil rights issue, the so-called “bathroom debate,” and trans people in general. I have to say that from a theological standpoint, I found little to fault with it. It fits the theological worldview that many Baptists share. That being said, the Convention’s position has one major flaw. If you’re an LGBTQ individual reading this, you’ll know better than anyone that you don’t share that worldview. You approach this entire subject from a completely different angle, so to speak. And that’s fine. The flaw in the Convention’s position is that we don’t even bother to acknowledge that difference. We have our reasons for seeing things as we do, we want you to come around to see things our way, and that’s that. For example, I read through one article that was provided to me by the ERLC about how feeling like your actual gender doesn’t match your physical gender is a diagnosable medical condition called gender dysphoria, and it’s our job as Christians to love you through that struggle until you come to a place where the gender you feel you are matches the gender you physically are. So this thing which you say makes you who you are, well, as the Convention sees it, it just means you’re confused. Basically, you’re mentally ill.

Without being too blunt, like I said I understand the theology behind the Convention’s position, but how the hell are we supposed to love and respect you, to be ambassadors for Christ and show you that he loves you enough that he died to get you back, if we can’t even acknowledge and respect where you’re coming from?

What we have here, in essence, are two completely different cultures (something else I think we as Christians have a hard time understanding). It’s long been an issue in church history that it’s not enough for us to try to share the Gospel but we have to bring along our culture as well. The Apostle Paul dealt with it in the New Testament. He wrote the Letter to the Galatians to oppose those who believed it wasn’t enough simply for Gentiles to believe in Jesus but they also had to keep the Jewish law (including circumcision). And 1500 years later, when church missionary efforts were headquartered in Europe, those who brought the Gospel around the world were notorious for bringing European civilization along with it. In short, we have a bad habit of believing that in order for you to be acceptable to God, you also have to become like us. What we forget is that every time we try that, all we do is hurt people. That, more than anything else, is what I think is driving the Convention’s position in this area.

And I know there are those who will read this and say that how we treat the LGBTQ community is not a cultural issue at all, that Scripture is very clear on this matter and that pretty well determines how we interact with you. Our job is not to enforce our beliefs on you, or to try to convince you to come around to seeing things our way. Our job, as representatives of Jesus here on Earth, is simply to take you as you are and love you as you are in hopes that through that you see his love for you. Anything that gets in the way of that not only hurts you but also stops us from being about the very thing that we are supposed to be about here in this world.

Please hear me when I say that taking you as you are does not mean for me that you are confused or mentally ill. It also does not mean that I view the reality of you being gay, or lesbian, or trans, or whatever, as a reality that only exists inside your head. It means that I will love and accept you as gay, lesbian, trans, or whatever. As a Christian I can do no less.

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One thought on “The Last Few Weeks

  1. Thank you for this sentence, well actually thank you for the entire post, but this sentence is particularly meaningful…”Please hear me when I say that taking you as you are does not mean for me that you are confused or mentally ill.” It causes me to picture a leper colony back in the Old Testament days. Hopefully your post here has reminded us all that a person cannot come to experience and know the love of God and the love of the community of God when treated as an outcast. Thanks again.

    Like

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